So if we play the C major scale, but begin on the note D, we alter the sequence of whole and half steps. The displacement of the intervals creates a different tonality. In the key of C major, this will give us the D Dorian mode, which, as you can see, is constructed on the 2nd scale degree of the standard major scale. 

The presence of the G# in the Harmonic Minor scale changes the names of the modes, because they now contain a different tone. For example, D Dorian has now become D Dorian (Augmented fourth): This mode differs from D Dorian by one note, the G#, which is an augmented fourth away from the Tonic, hence its name D Dorian (Augmented fourth). In the same scale, the mode constructed on E has now become E Phrygian (Major third). Since a Phrygian mode is by definition a minor mode, some people prefer to call it Mixolydian (Minor second, Minor sixth).

Alex is a multi-instrumentalist, composer and producer from Sydney, Australia. He founded the post-rock band sleepmakeswaves, with which he has toured Asia, America, Europe and Australia. In his spare time he writes music for short films, produces bands and subsists on altogether too much coffee. Alex is the instructor of the free Soundfly course, Live Clicks and Backing Tracks.

Artist grants 2019

Student-Artist: Emily McCullough

Another extremely common and timeless technique to make your chorus shine is simply cutting the music out completely for half a measure or even an entire measure in some cases. Some of today’s electronic producers also prefer cutting out effects such as reverb and delay, to make that moment of silence even more dramatic, like you’re falling off a tiny cliff. This technique is especially fun to apply in situations where the chorus vocals start with pick-up notes from the previous measure.

All of our mentored online courses come with six weeks of 1-on-1 professional support and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! That means you’re not just getting the course content, but a coach to bounce ideas off of and someone invested in your success. Check out our courses such as Songwriting for Producers, Beat Making in Ableton Live, and of course The Art of Hip-Hop Production, and preview any or all for free!

The basic awkwardness of harmonics-based tuning systems has caused musicians a lot of confusion and irritation over the years. Depending on your starting pitch, some intervals can be perfectly in tune, but others can’t be. And the more harmonically complex you want your music to be, the worse the tuning issues are going to get.

Flypaper ran over 320 articles this year. Let the Soundfly staff navigate you through the best of the best in this list of our Top 5 articles from 2018.

Gangsta rappers 2019

Some musicians believe that if they make great music, everything else around their career will be taken care of; and this is a huge mistake. The truth is that no one should be more concerned about the non-musical aspects of your career than you. This means paying attention to things like song royalties, licensing agreements, and the details of every contract you sign. You don’t need to be a legal expert to be a musician, but having a passive attitude about the less flashy aspects of your music career can lead to devastating consequences.

Learn more on Soundfly: Our new mentored online course Songwriting for Producers will help you push your songwriting skills closer to your production skills, and give you the ability to visualize commercial-market-ready versions of your tracks. Attack your production dreams today! 

Narada Michael Walden, who produced “I Wanna Dance With Somebody,” once said that recording this song “was about trying to create the best possible record that will last for hundreds of years.” And that’s exactly what they got. It was a #1 hit when it was released in 1987, and over 30 years later, people still dance to this at weddings and sing their hearts out to it.

With overwhelmingly positive results, we’re happy to share a few testimonials of Soundfly’s Orchestration For Strings course directly from our students.

So, now that you’re equipped with some of the tools and knowledge of the most common forms of song structure, keep in mind yet again that there are no rules to songwriting! There are only basic ideas and pieces of advice that you can borrow from as you sit down and create something that’s meaningful to you! It’s helpful to have these weapons in your arsenal. When it comes down to it, the best thing you can do as a new songwriter experimenting with song structure is to try and write with all kinds of structures and figure out what works best for you.