The music becomes frantic and highly directional. It is pointing towards a piu’ che sforzatissimo (sfff) octave double-stop in the low register, followed by the apparition of silence, which contributes to hold back the accumulated energy for a moment (2:03). It is this moment of silence which creates a striking contrast with what follows: A powerful “quadruple-stop” (marked with “tutta la forza” — or, “with utmost strength” — and “ferocissimo” — “very ferocious”) in which five octaves divide the notes in the left and right hands (2:09).

From where I’m sitting, some other “holy grails” include the Moog Sub Phatty (bass synth perfection), the Oberheim Matrix 6 (the best pad presets), and the Roland Jazz Chorus amplifier (the best clean tone in the game), just to name a few. But the Roland RE-201 might even top that list. Its tone, ease-of-use, and design are unparalleled when it comes to echo/delay effects and it continues to be an inspiration to effects producers to this day.

“Artists of the early 1700s did not wear their lives on their sleeves… Their goal was not to expose the hidden and the personal but to replicate the empirical and the universal; their domain was not the unconscious but the observable world.”

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You’re also going to need a delay, one way or the other. When it comes to delay pedals, there is analog modulation and digital modulation. Many people automatically point to analog delays to say they are better than digital, but it’s always a question of taste, and most guitarists out there exploring expansive sound palettes will have both on their board. Analog delays sound more like a tape machine; their echoing tone changes the pitch a bit up or down and it’s darker fading out then a digital delay. The latter sounds more like an exact copy of the inserted signal that fades away. If you are a guitarist who likes to tap the delay time with your feet, this will affect your pedal choice as well.

One other interesting thing about the I-IV-V progression is that, within the chord tones of this progression, it collectively outlines the entire major scale. Remember, the I chord is D, made up of the notes D, F♯, and A; the V chord is A, made up of the notes A, C♯, and E; and the IV chord is G, made up of the notes G, B, and D.

The problem is that these tendencies are the exact opposite of what we should be doing if we want to see real improvement, according to Dr. Anders Ericsson. And we might be wise to listen. Dr. Ericsson is widely considered one of the foremost thinkers on the subject of “expertise.” His research is one of the primary sources that inspired Malcolm Gladwell’s now-famous “10,000 Hour Rule” — that it takes 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to be an expert in anything. But that rule, though memorable, is far from the whole story.

Solution: Create criteria. One of the biggest mistakes ambitious musicians make is overbooking just for the sake of playing out. I constantly hear colleagues complaining about gigs their bandleaders probably shouldn’t have taken in the first place. A band member once made me promise I would only take gigs if I could answer “yes” to at least two of these questions: (1) Is it lucrative enough to ensure that no band member is losing money (including the pay they would sacrifice if they had to turn down another show because of this one)? (2) Will it give us real exposure or positively build the band’s identity? (3) Could it be the most fun we’ve had all year?

It’s like going on a camping trip. You can just strike out into the woods anytime, but you’ll probably do a lot better if you have a route planned out, know how to store your food to keep bears away, and have a vague idea where the shortcut you’re taking is going to send you.

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In some of the earlier works on this list, we’ve heard the theremin produce quartertones, reverberated sci-fi soundscapes, dissonance, and virtuosity. But here, it’s just plain pretty. In fact, it’s simply beautiful! The theremin holds center stage here showing yet another timbral side to the instrument: its angelic, siren, somnambulant quality and characteristics.

Every time the cycle repeats, that low E root is right there to support that downbeat. Notice that it doesn’t have to hit every downbeat of the pattern, but it must hit on that repeated downbeat at the start of the cycle. Funky bass lines emphasize beat one and lay a solid rhythmic foundation.

As a general rule, I think comparing your work to other artists can be a pretty unhealthy practice, especially if you have a competitive mentality. But when it comes to duplicating marketing activities and online strategies, learning from them and their tests mean that you aren’t always starting from scratch.

Another simple-to-remember example is the nursery rhyme, “Three Blind Mice.” The first two notes in the melody are what you’ll want to focus on, at 0:00.

The use of new technology in classrooms is a hot topic. Particularly in the field of music, tech can fundamentally reshape the whole nature of education: what it means and who it’s for. As such, controversy swirls around the use of technology in the context of music education. This discussion explores what technology brings to the classroom and what it has taken away, as well as how it has transformed student musicians from performers to composers. But it’s also quite long, so feel free to skip ahead and read on if you’d like to read our “talking points.”