So, the Institute has collected and kept enormous records of French radio and television broadcast archives since since the 1960s. These archives are available online and are viewed and listened by people of all ages and walks of life every single day. The archives are currently only available online, and the majority of this collection remains unexplored.

With overwhelmingly positive results, we’re happy to share a few testimonials of Soundfly’s Orchestration For Strings course directly from our students.

Born in Cambridge, England, Judith Weir’s musical path has been a very British one. Having studied with Sir John Taverner at an early age and later at King’s College Cambridge, Weir’s music proudly takes inspiration from British medieval history and the traditional folk arts of her parents’ homeland of Scotland. Another star-studded member of this list, Weir won an Ivor Novello Award in 2015 and a year earlier was appointed the first female Master of the Queen’s Music, a position which she currently holds for ten years, succeeding Sir Peter Maxwell Davis. True to her traditional roots and interests, Weir’s music has strong roots in British choral music, yet her output also includes eight operas, many orchestral works, chamber pieces, and solo instrumental pieces. If you’re after something modern and yet deeply rooted in tradition, I highly recommend the work of Dame Judith Weir.

National music charity

Sure, it may not be a fully produced radio-ready single, but you will end up with a great-sounding demo that could save you a lot of time and money if or when you eventually bring your tracks to a professional studio. And the best part is, you don’t even really need a keyboard. Of course, it helps to have one, but a MIDI controller or even your laptop keyboard can work just fine.

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A fifth in 12-TET is defined as seven semitones. Instead of multiplying your frequency by 3/2, you multiply by the 12th root of two seven times, which is about 1.498. That’s close, but not quite on the nose. Major thirds are worse in 12-TET. Instead of multiplying your frequency by 5/4, you multiply by the 12th root of two four times. That gives you 1.25992, which is not very close to 5/4 at all. Nevertheless, we as a civilization have collectively decided that we should just suck it up and live with everything sounding a little wrong. There are plenty of good reasons to!

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s ballet, “Swan Lake, Opus 20” contains a very distinct melody that you might not think you’d recognize until you hear it. At 0:03 of Act II, the oboe solo clearly establishes the perfect fifth in a beautiful descending line.

Endlessly acquiring gear is a habit that can turn into an obsession. Whether you’re stockpiling synths, pedals, guitars, or plugins, your collection can turn into a burden that weighs you down creatively. Ask yourself these ten questions to find out if there’s any gear you have that you could do without.

Fender online

In order to set up yourself for success, keep your cords, microphones, headphones, and instrument equipment organized in specific, consistent spots so you always know where they are when you need them. And then, after you’re done with them, always return these items to their respective spots. Put guitars in cases or hang them on the wall, coil cables when they’re not in use, and build shelves to store stuff that gets used less frequently. Big plastic storage bins are also a great option for extra cables and assorted items.

If things went according to plan, you probably made new friends and fans over the course of the tour. Now that you’re home, you’re noticing a bump in your social following and you have new people asking when you’re coming back to their town.

These questions are important. Hopefully this quick guide can help you pick out the right amp for your needs. And since you probably don’t live in an area with unlimited choice, we know it can sometimes be hard to find niche, small production amps and it’s usually quite expensive to buy vintage pieces. So we wanted to focus on amps that are largely available in music stores anywhere. This list features common guitar amplifiers and their “types,” if you find similar amps, replicas, or alternate versions or editions, those would all work great!

“[Bariolage] is a common technique to build tension near the end of a long violin piece and there are numerous possible inspirations for this particular passage in earlier chaconnes. In the Bach Chaconne, however, given that right mood and right performer, it matters not at all if one knows what a bariolage is or where it came from. What matters is that it sounds like a kind of outcry — not the sad little two-note sighs we have been taught to listen for in Mozart or Chopin, but long, hoarse-throated, mascara-streaked, Jessye Norman — collapsing-in-a-heap groans. Once you’ve felt this passage that way once, it is hard not to feel it that way every time you hear the Chaconne, and even to demand it, judging performers on the Daniel Day-Lewis scale of how many forehead veins they sound like they’re about to pop.”

One such example of horizontal hemiola that follows a similar design appears in George Frideric Handel’s iconic “Alla Hornpipe” from his Water Music Suite No. 2. In the video below, the hemiola occurs about 13 seconds in. It’s easiest to notice this happening in the harmony voices, which switch from a 3 feel to a 4 feel, with quarter notes being momentarily grouped in sets of four and groups spreading across the bar line. Without changing time signatures, the pulse of the music momentarily changes, resulting in a perfect example of horizontal hemiola.